Lou's Place in Cyberspace


CASTLE VALLEY MILL

THIRD FLOOR- "CYCLONE" Separator

Home ] Up ] EXTERIOR ] FIRST FLOOR ] LEFT FRONT ELEVATOR ] SECOND FLOOR ] THIRD FLOOR ] POWER FRAME ] EUREKA BRUSH MACHINE ] [ CYCLONE SEPERATOR ] CENTRAL ELEVATOR ] BOLTER ] POWER TAKE-OFF ] POWER CLUTCH ] HOPPER ] ANNEX ] BASEMENT ] STRUCTURE ] MILL HISTORY ] Trade Mark case ]

As the dust, smut, and other grain debris was exhausted out of the Eureka Brush Machine, it was forced by wind current created by the Brush Machine fan to blow down a wooden duct or "wind trunk" to the Cyclone separator, located towards the rear of the mill, opposite the Main Power Frame. This device was essentially a dust collector eliminating dust that could cloud the air and be explosive under certain conditions.

Here the debris received its final cleaning. All the material such as Wheat shells or other grain shell, dust, smut, dust balls, etc. passed out of the separator via a port at the bottom passing to the second floor where it was collected and discarded.

Before this type device was invented, dust was filtered with screening cloth but it would often clog due to a type of paste formed by the grain dust and humidity, clogging the filtering screen.

The cyclone separator was very effective in removing dust and having no moving parts. The shape of the device was the key to its success. The Cyclone separator is in the shape of an inverted cone with the larger end at the top. It is divided into three sections.

Product entering the device entered the cone, at section two, being the mid part. As the dust entered the device, because of its shape and vanes on the interior, it created a swirling turbulence. While the product was caught in this swirling motion, the material would hit the sides of the device. The heavier product would drop from gravity, to the bottom of the cone shaped device, and exit to the second floor. The cleaned air was exhausted up a central tube and via an exhaust duct to the outside of the building. The cone shape created a change in the air pressure helping the separation process.

Cyclone Separator "as found" in the mill.

Photo showing the middle input "wind trunk", right, and the exhaust duct mounted on top of unit, exiting top left corner. Note the input chamber or plenum is made of offset metal sheets appearing as a circular "Ratchet" pattern, each section is offset one inch higher than the previous. The lower cone shaped chamber is of the same construction.

View of input duct or "wind trunk" to central plenum.

View of exhaust duct on the top of the device. A wooden boxed duct connected to this port vented the cleaned air to the exterior of the Mill.

Exhaust port in wall of mill, covered over. Exhaust duct is missing.

Bottom of Cyclone Separator where it passes thru floor to second floor area for bagging and disposal.

Period illustration showing the interior actions.

Another illustration showing the air currents within.

Illustration of an early model showing the sections of the device and air flow. "A" is the top section with exhaust port on top. "B" is the middle input chamber, "B1" is the cone separator with the debris exiting the bottom. "C" is center exhaust tube exhausting through top hole in section A. This version shows a central shaft which was not used in later models. "D" illustrates air flow.

Period article describing the device operation.

 

Ariel view showing the "wind trunk" from the Eureka Brush Machine, lower right center, and the exhaust duct from the Cyclone to the exterior of the Mill, top right.

View of wind trunk from Eureka Brush Machine connected to the Cyclone’s input port.

Rear view of Cyclone as found in the mill today. Here it is illustrated as if new. The original color is not known but usually was flat black. Exhaust duct to the exterior of the Mill was connected to the duct chamber on right.

Side view showing exhaust duct connect to the metal exhaust port on top of Cyclone cleaner.

The exhaust was very free of organic particles leaving little dust to enter the atmosphere.

View of wind trunk duct from the exhaust of the Eureka Brush Machine to the Cyclone cleaner.

View from the Interior of lower cone section looking up at the clean air exhaust port tube.

View of exhaust port tube which directed the clean air to the exhaust chamber. This view is looking into the output duct chamber, showing tube in center.

Note the mud wasps built their nests all over the Mill, including the inside of the Cyclone.

This galvanized metal "Monarch" dust collector dates from 1935.

Home ] Up ] EXTERIOR ] FIRST FLOOR ] LEFT FRONT ELEVATOR ] SECOND FLOOR ] THIRD FLOOR ] POWER FRAME ] EUREKA BRUSH MACHINE ] [ CYCLONE SEPERATOR ] CENTRAL ELEVATOR ] BOLTER ] POWER TAKE-OFF ] POWER CLUTCH ] HOPPER ] ANNEX ] BASEMENT ] STRUCTURE ] MILL HISTORY ] Trade Mark case ]